The Details Explaining Tori Spelling's Financial Turmoil

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(Photo: Getty / Brad Barket / Stringer)

With this week's report of City National Bank's default judgment issued against Tori Spelling and husband Dean McDermott, it's no secret that the Spelling-McDermott clan is in a world of financial hurt.

But how did the family get in so much debt? Spelling, who just gave birth to her and McDermott's fifth child earlier this month, opened up about her financial struggles in her 2013 book Spelling It Like It Is

"It's not my fault I'm an uptown girl stuck in a midtown life. I was raised in opulence. My standards are ridiculously high. We can't afford that lifestyle, but when you grow up silver spoon it's hard to go plastic," she wrote.

"It's no mystery why I have money problems. I grew up rich beyond anyone's wildest dreams. I never knew anything else. Even when I try to embrace a simpler lifestyle, I can't seem to let go of my expensive tastes. Even when my tastes aren't fancy, they're still costly. I moved houses to simplify my life, but lost almost a million dollars along the way," she continued.

MORE: Tori Spelling Says She 'Admires' Shannen Doherty During Her Cancer Battle

Here we'll take you through the financial issues we know about to shed a clearer light on Tori Spelling's situation.

City National Bank

In December 2016, City National Bank sued Spelling and McDermott for $188,803 for failure to make payments on a $400,000 loan they took out in 2012. The bank alleged that Spelling and McDermott owed $185,714 plus $2,407 in interest and $681 in late charges for a total of $188,803. The bank also requesting that Spelling pay back an additional $17,149 that she allegedly overdrew in September, bringing the total amount owed to $205,952.

This week, City National Bank issued a default judgment against Spelling and McDermott, which means that if the judgment is granted, the bank could have claim to their assets.

A post shared by Tori Spelling (@torispelling) on

American Express

In January 2016, Spelling was sued by American Express for $37,981. In August, Spelling was ordered to pay back the full amount plus over $800 in legal fees.

Then in November, American Express issued another lawsuit against Spelling — this time for $87,594 in unpaid credit card debt. Court documents stated that the actress failed to pay $87,594.55 in fees on one of her American Express platinum credit cards.

Tax lien

Lastly, in July 2016 the state of California issued a tax lien to Spelling and McDermott for $259,108 in unpaid state taxes from 2014. The tax lien means that until the debt is paid off, the state can obtain any assets the couple currently own or will own in the future.

Spelling has had varied responses to her financial struggles.

In 2013, she told ET that she made some bad decisions. "Just because I'm on TV doesn't mean that I don't make financial choices that aren't good," she explained. "They were really bad ones."

However, in March she slammed rumors of bankruptcy, saying the rumors started after she wrote about money troubles in her book.

“I thought I was being relatable, talking about how celebrities go through financial struggles, too, we make mistakes, too,” she told PEOPLE. “We’re not perfect, we have made a lot of choices financially with real estate that didn’t work out … and that just escalated into this story about financial struggles, bankruptcy. To this day that haunts me!”

Adding, “We’re not bankrupt, we’re not struggling, we’re fine!”

However Spelling and McDermott's financial situation is, it's clear that they're getting some help from Spelling's mom, Candy Spelling.

Candy told TMZ in January that she was helping her daughter out financially.

"I've been paying all her bills now, except I'm not paying extras like that," Candy said. "I'm not paying any back payments—just for the house, and the kids' schools, and their food."

Related:

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