Can Your Relationship Hurt Your Health?

| Women's Health

Can your relationship status make a difference in your overall wellbeing? You may feel more happy overall while in a serious partnership with your significant other, but what other aspects of your health can your relationship affect? Health.com shares psychologist Maryann Troiani, PhD's thoughts below.

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Weight gain: It's a common belief that couples "let themselves go" after pairing off, and there may be something to it. According to a 2012 review, people tend to gain weight as they settle into marriage and lose weight when a marriage ends.

But Troiani has seen the opposite happen quite often, as well: "A happy couple can motivate each other to stay healthy — they'll go to the gym together, set goals, and feel responsible for each other." When couples do pack on the pounds, she adds, it may be a symptom of conflict, not slacking off. "Dissatisfaction in the relationship can lead to passive-aggressive eating behaviors and sleep problems, which will lead to weight gain," she says.

Stress levels: Surprise, surprise: Regular physical intimacy appears to reduce stress and boost well-being. One study, published in 2009 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, found that people who frequently had sex were healthier mentally and more likely to report greater satisfaction with their relationship and life overall.

Sex is just one aspect of a relationship, however. And your partner's behavior outside the bedroom can just as easily send stress levels soaring in the opposite direction. Parenting disputes, disagreements over money, or even questions as simple as who does which household chores have been shown to increase stress.

>> Read more: 40 Healthy Wasy to Relax and De-Stress

Feel-good hormones: Sex isn't the only type of physical contact that can lower stress and improve health. In a 2004 study of 38 couples, University of North Carolina researchers found that both men and women had higher blood levels of oxytocin, a hormone believed to ease stress and improve mood, after hugging. The women also had lower blood pressure post-hug, and lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol.

"These types of caring behaviors are so important: a touch on the arm, holding hands, a rub on the shoulder," Troiani says. "It only takes a few seconds of contact to stimulate those hormones and to help overcome stress and anxiety."

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Sleep problems: Sleeping next to someone you love and trust can help you fully relax and embrace sleep, Troiani says. A big exception to that rule, of course, is if your bedmate keeps you up at night — by snoring, for instance, or by tossing and turning. In a 2005 poll, people were more likely to experience daytime fatigue and fitful sleep themselves if their partner was struggling with insomnia.

Relationships can affect sleep in less direct ways, too. Research shows that relationship insecurity or conflict is associated with poorer sleep — and to make matters worse, sleep problems can exacerbate relationship problems, creating a vicious cycle.

Anxiety: Relationship difficulties can put anyone on edge, but in some cases they may actually contribute to full-blown anxiety. Several studies have found a link between marital problems and an increased risk of diagnoses such as generalized anxiety disorder and social anxiety.

These links can be difficult to untangle, however, since anxiety has been shown to breed relationship problems (and not just vice versa). What's more, some research suggests marriage may help protect against anxiety. In a 2010 World Health Organization study of 35,000 people in 15 countries, those who were married — happily or otherwise (the study didn't specify)— were less likely to develop anxiety and other mental disorders.

What other health aspects can your relationship affect? Click here to read the original article on Health.com.